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The Veteran's Day Journey

A Day of Dedication and Honor to the Men and Women Who Have Chosen Serve, Protect and Fight for You, Me, and Every Person We Love.



Each year we celebrate Veteran's Day on the 11th day of November, sometimes while sporting the infamous colors of our beloved flag, often while surrounded by friends and family, maybe even roasting hotdogs and hamburgers in the backyard, a true American tradition. So why not take a moment to learn about the holiday we often take for granted, and how much went into even giving a simple day its very own name.

 

1918

The eleventh day of November, nine months prior to the signing of the Treaty of Versailles (the official documentation to end World War I), the forces of the Allied Nations and soldiers of Germany collectively laid down their battle weapons and began the long road toward peace.


1926

The President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation resulting in all government buildings displaying the American Flag on all government buildings and inviting the American people to celebrate in schools, churches, and wherever else deemed appropriate.


1938

November 11th is declared a legal holiday dedicated to celebrating the cause of world peace. This was to be known as "Armistice Day" and be observed with the intention of honoring World War I veterans for their service, patriotism, and sacrifice to protect the common good.


1954

World War II has ended and taken an unprecedented toll on the nation, with greater sacrifice from the United States Armed Forces than ever before. The 83rd Congress decides to amend the Act of 1938 naming November 11th "Armistice Day" to be furthermore known as "Veteran's Day" with the intention of honoring veterans of all wars in our nation's history.

 

For over 100 years the American people have gathered to celebrate our nation's heroes for the sacrifices they have made and trials they have faced on our behalf, with nothing in return. So this Veteran's Day, hold your family close, thank Heavenly Father for your blessings, and say a prayer for those who continue to fight for each an every one of us.


"We may not know them all, but we owe them all."

Next time you stand for the National Anthem in school, at a football game, or on the chutes of the next rodeo as Old Glory is flown down to the arena by an American Hero, remember how much each person went through to give such a powerful day its very own name.




Until next time...

Keep those Boots Busy!


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